Saturday, August 15, 2015

Surprising late season blooms

I am terrible, simply terrible about leaving plants in pots too long...like this white rose. This is one determined rose...putting forth two more big pretty blooms here late in the season.



Some of you may remember the picture from this past spring. 



This rose deserves a special place in the yard. Right now the ground is dry and too hard to dig but it won't always be this way. When the rainy days come again and the weather cools off a bit, this sweet rose is getting out of it's root bound pot.

And speaking of too long in a pot, I really need your help with this one.



For two or three years out working in the yard I would see this sprout growing out the side of a clay bank. Finally one day, feeling sorry for the struggling little plant, I pulled it up and put it in a small pot and kept it watered...it began to grow and soon needed a bigger pot, then an even bigger pot. So here we are. This pretty dogwood tree is healthy and happy and will have red berries this winter. But it's roots have grown through the pot and into the ground. It won't budge.

I've heard that dogwood trees die easily if their roots are damaged. What in the world am I going to do?  Most of you out there have a green thumb and a beautiful yard. I would appreciate any suggestions? After saving the struggling little tree, I sure hate to now kill it.



Joe Pye weed grows wild here, but a few years back I had ordered some through the mail. Never could find the right spot to plant them. Joe Pye weed likes moist soil. Tired of worrying about them, I carefully dumped all the sprouts I had started into the wet weather creek that runs across the back yard, and forgot about them. Yesterday, I was surprised at all the fuzzy pink blooms and happy butterflies...






Turned out to be a good dumping place.



The Rose of Sharon is thriving and all the tiny babies I dug from the hard dry ground...



For somebody who has run out of anything to post, I've really taken up your time and over done it here! :)

Thank you for your nice encouraging comments. Hope to be back soon. 

Love,
Henny




23 comments:

  1. Glad to see someone has butterflies. I have yet to see one! All your flowers look lovely.

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    1. Thank you. I love the butterflies too.

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  2. Joe Pye weed is a real butterfly magnet. Yours are so pretty. I don't have any advice on the dogwood but it will be interesting to see what others say. Have a nice weekend.

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    1. Thank you Cynthia. Hope you had a good weekend.

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  3. For the dogwood, cut away the plastic pot. Use a hand spade and do a little digging to see just where the roots went. Then you should be able to use a shovel and pop out the chunk of dirt with most of the roots. With that young of a tree, you shouldn't have a problem transplanting it. Just be careful to water it frequently through the fall.

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    1. Thank you Denny144. I appreciate the help. If I am careful and follow what you and the others have suggested, the little tree might survive.

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  4. Your dogwood tree appears to be in a plastic pot. When the tree goes dormant, cut away the pot and carefully loosen the roots that have wrapped around the root ball. Spread them out as much as you can. Don't try to untangle them all. Cut off the roots that have gone through the bottom of the pot to free it. Make clean cuts on any broken roots. Dig a hole wide enough to spread out loosened roots. Plant the tree to exactly the same depth as it was in the pot. Water the roots in well.

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    1. Yes, it is a plastic pot. I'm glad you mentioned waiting until the tree is dormant. While there is time, I need to find the right spot to dig a hole. Thank you for your help Linda.

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  5. I'm glad at least two people had good tips on what to do with your Dogwood. I love Butterflies, almost as much as I love Hummingbirds. I'm not sure if Joe Pye weed is common around here. I don't think I've ever seen any. If they attract Butterflies maybe I should look for some.

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    1. I did get some good advice on moving that dogwood. Wish you could see some of the wild Joe Pye weed here. It gets really tall and can grow up to 12 feet high. Of course, mine is not nearly that tall.

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  6. Hi! Your white rose is so pretty! I dislike repotting things but wondered if you could cut the pot away from the tree without damaging the roots as a couple others have suggested? Nancy

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    1. Thank you Nancy. I enjoy starting plants and trying to root cuttings. I am bad about leaving plants in a pot too long. With all the good suggestions, I should be able to put that dogwood in the ground.

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  7. Linda's suggestion about the dogwood sounds the best so far. Do be sure to loosen the roots that have wrapped round and round the inside of the pot. If you don't they will just continue to go round and round once in the ground. It sounds like a very determined little dogwood and will most likely just go to town once in the ground. Choose a coolish, cloudy day right after a rain to do the job so that it has an easy transition.

    I love the joe pye weed. I have put in a number of them in two different flower beds here and they are beginning to bloom for me this year. I just love the soft color and their puffy, airy shape. In the same two beds I also have some ironweed which is just the most gorgeous purple that you can imagine. I had planned to add to the ones that I have now and just the other day found about 5 seedlings in the herb garden which is nowhere near the other two areas planted with them. Wonder how that happened and how I managed not to pull them up thinking that they were weeds before the blooms started showing up and identifying them? I guess procrastination sometimes works to ones advantage.

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    1. That is a good idea. Cooler and cloudy would be better. I would sure hate to kill this dogwood. Wish you could have seen how it looked growing in the clay bank. It never grew more than two leaves and it grew out from the bank and then curled upward and was about six inches long. I'm attached to it. We have ironweed that grows on the back side of the pond. I remember loving the purple color and looking up the plant in the wildflower book. I had never thought about bringing some to the yard. I haven't seen any in a while now.

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  8. Your Joe Pye Weed looks great and doing what it was meant to be a butterfly plant! Just hack those roots away when you are ready to plant...do try to uncurl some of the curled up roots inside the pot...it isn't easy. You should scar up some of those roots so they make new roots. Give the roots plenty of space in the hole and keep moist for about two weeks then the roots should have taken hold. (Root pruning is done all the time in nurseries:)

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    1. Thank you and I appreciate the help with the dogwood. You had a nursery, didn't you? I do love these butterflies!

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  9. I would have done what Linda suggested and I have to say she really has green fingers her garden is magnificent. My garden is looking a little tatty at the moment it needs some love.

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    1. My garden is the same. This time of the year things are getting pretty ragged looking.

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  10. Oh I'm not a greenthumb myself and pretty much scared of taking care of plants especially transferring one from a pot.

    Your white roses are adorable and baby plants too. I'm pretty sure they'll grow healthy and sturdy in your garden.

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    1. Thank you. I.m afraid of moving the white rose too. Sometimes my thumb is not so green. :)

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  11. You have such a wonderful green thumb! After almost 5 years I have two Japanese maples that are still growing in pots after a friend who was moving gave them to me...to plant :) They do well and stay small so I am in no hurry to do so...I would probably kill them if I planted them in our rocky red clay! I wish I help you with your dogwood delimma...good luck!

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  12. Hey Debby. I'm not so sure about the green thumb. Like you, I'm afraid once I try to put that little tree in the ground it will die. Was thinking about you and wondering if you have ever been to Star, NC, or Seagrove to the pottery places.

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  13. Thank you for your lovely sweet comment on my post and for following too. I also leave plants in their pots for far longer than necessary, I'm glad from the comments you've received so far that there is some suitable advice for you. Take care x

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